Tag Archive: Corning Museum of Glass


Glass Beads

SusansBeadsWhile I was visiting the Corning Museum of glass, they were having a special exhibit on beads. As it happens this is the one aspect of glass art I have some experience with, through a friend who makes glass beads and has given me several. Hers are in the category the museum called wrapped beads.

bead_moose2These beads are made on a mandrill, which is a metal core coated with something that makes the beads release easily. Glass heated to a taffy-like consistency is wrapped onto the core. Blobs of glass may be added and either used to form a shape (like the moose, one of my friend’s beads) or to produce color. But producing color isn’t simple, as the bead is glowing orange through this process! An experienced bead-maker may have a pretty good idea of the finished colors, but I certainly don’t by watching!

bead_dragonfly2Small “seed beads” are most often made by cutting hollow rods of class into small lengths. In this case, the artistry is in how the beads are combined into the finished piece.

The museum had exhibits of all kinds of beads, and explanations of how they were made. I’ll content myself with photos of an exhibit showing numerous kinds of beads mounted in a pattern on the wall, and a closeup showing a few of the beads in more detail.

bead displaycloseup- beads

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Glass Sculptures

I’m home from the hospital, but my energy level is still pretty low. So once again you’re getting pictures from the Corning Museum of Glass.

Most of these sculptures are my height or more, especially this one.

Most of these sculptures are my height or more, especially this one.

A beautiful example of making glass look like fabric.

A beautiful example of making glass look like fabric.

I debated over including this one, because of the the reflections on the case. But it's a beautiful piece of work.

I debated over including this one, because of the the reflections on the case. But it’s a beautiful piece of work, especially in three dimensions..

Corning Again? (Yes, I’m Cheating.)

Well, if sitting in a hospital bed with unfamiliar wifi, a laptop that seems determined to fight me to the death and half my passwords/logins missing (they’re on my computer at home, some 350 miles north), isn’t an excuse, what is? So since I did download lots of pictures to iPhoto on the new machine before I left Fairbanks,  you’re going to get pictures.

These really struck me. They're made of colored glass fibers slumped over or into a form. Beautiful, no?

These really struck me. They’re made of colored glass fibers slumped over or into a form. Beautiful, no?

A totally different type of jar, made with a completely different technique

A totally different type of jar, made with a completely different technique

This one has to be just to show it can be done. I[t foamed glass, made to look lie styrofoam that's half melted.

This one has to be just to show it can be done. It’s foamed glass, made to look like styrofoam that’s half melted.

As a ps, I’m happy to say that I’ve been kicked out  released from the hospital, so I’m now back at the motel room but with my keyboard and mouse. And I am trying (cautiously) to get around the room with a cane instead of a walker — one hand is better than none for carrying things.

Shipping from the Corning Glass Museum

Shipping box and bubble wrap. When I put the bubble wrap back in the box,, I could barely close it.

Shipping box and bubble wrap. When I put the bubble wrap back in the box,, I could barely close it.

When I got home from a week each in Ithaca and at the Harvard reunion, there was a box on the living room floor. A large box, big enough to make a playhouse for a small child. I couldn’t remember ordering anything that huge. But then I saw the “glass” stickers on all sides, remembered I’d done some shopping at the Cornell Glass Museums store, and had the store send my purchases to me. Surely I hadn’t bought that much!

All that box and bubble wrap to ship these.

All that box and bubble wrap to ship these.

When I opened the box, all I could see was Styrofoam pellets. Even after I scooped out half a trash bag full, I could see nothing but Styrofoam. Digging through the pellets, I finally felt bubble wrap and pulled out a book – heavily cushioned in bubble wrap. Then another, the Corelle dishes I’d bought (they aren’t in the stores in Fairbanks), the jigsaw puzzle of one of Chihuly’s chandeliers, and finally two small glass paperweights. Everything was cocooned in bubble wrap.

Paperweights

Close-up of the two small paperweights.

Obviously the store clerks were used to packing fragile items to withstand the tender handling of FedEx! At any rate, they beat me to Alaska and arrived in beautiful condition.

The Corning Museum of Glass

One of the places I love to go while visiting my sister in Ithaca, New York is the Corning Museum of Glass in Corning, New York. It’s about an hour’s drive away, and really too large for an oldie like me to cover in a day. But I did get some pictures. Unfortunately I did not get all the details about the artists, but enjoy a few pictures.

Burial boxDragon LensGlass boats